A Tale Of A Tub

Exhibition Onsite from 19 March 2016 to 17 April 2016

Politics of Estrangement – naught

Jack Segbars | Politics of Estrangement – naught

 

This spring Jack Segbars presents an intermediary recording of his long term investigation into the structure of contemporary art production. From an insider-perspective Segbars gives insight into the shifting position of the various players in the production process. Segbars based his research on his participation in the Saas Fee Summer Institute of Art in 2015. This summer school exemplifies how making an artistic object in today’s world cannot be separated from theory, curatorial and institutional strategies. There exists a high degree of entanglement between the artist, institution, curator and the theory that bears joint aspects of the authorship of the artistic object.

 

Segbars processes his experiences from the summer school in Saas Fee at A Tale of a Tub by installing Politics of Estrangement – naught, in which Segbars thoughts on co-authorship are intertwined and enter into dialogue with ideas about art production by Anselm Franke and Warren Neidich, who also participated in the summer school.


Jack Segbars (NL, 1963) is an artist, curator and writer, engaged with the conditions and parameters that shape art-production. Segbars explores the different forms and positions that shape the praxis of art: the artist, the role of language in the art discourse and the role of the curator. He currently works as a PhD researcher at the university of Leiden. In 2009 he produced the publication Rondom-All around the periphery (Onomatopee) that deals with the overlap of positions and domains. In 2012 he produced the publication Inertia (Onomatopee). Segbars is involved in Platform Visual Arts (Netherlands), a platform researching the role of art in times of political change and austerity. Segbars regularly writes reviews and articles on art and art-related subjects a.o. for Metropolis M.

 

This project is generously supported by the Mondriaan Fund.

Franke
Video interview with Anselm Franke, ca. 30 mins
Online